Identify

CDC's Tick identification chart illustrates the size and appearance of theBlacklegged Tick, Lone Star Tick and Dog Tick at larval, nymph and adult stages.

CDC’s Tick identification chart illustrates the size and appearance of the Blacklegged Tick, Lone Star Tick* and Dog Tick at larval, nymph and adult stages.

Fact Sheet: Biology and Management of Ticks in New Hampshire
University of New Hampshire Cooperative Extension
The UNH Cooperative Extension provides research-based information and education to NH residents including ticks and tick-borne diseases.

tickencounter.org
University of Rhode Island (URI)
The TickEncounter Resource Center promotes tick-bite protection and tick-borne disease prevention by engaging, educating, and empowering people to take action.

Tick Identification Chart
University of Rhode Island (URI)
Most ticks go through four life stages: egg, six-legged larva, eight-legged nymph, and adult. After hatching from the eggs, ticks must eat blood at every stage to survive. Ticks that require this many hosts can take up to 3 years to complete their full life cycle, and most will die because they don’t find a host for their next feeding.

Blacklegged Tick (Deer Tick) Lifecycle Chart
University of Rhode Island (URI)
This diagram shows the life cycle of blacklegged ticks that can transmit anaplasmosis, babesiosis, and Lyme disease.

UMass Laboratory of Medical Zoology
University of Massachusetts (UMass)
Use the UMass Laboratory of Medical Zoology’s website, TickReport.com, for reliable, high quality tick testing with the lowest cost and fastest turn-around time in the industry.

TickID: Know them. Prevent them.
New Hampshire Division of Public Health Services
Don’t miss a tick – Identification reference card for the life stages of the Blacklegged Tick.

*As of Summer 2016, NH DPHS has yet to detect the Lone Star tick in New Hampshire, but it is something being closely watched due to reports in Maine.

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